The Principal Navigations, Voiages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation,

£20,000

…made by sea or over-land, to the remote and farthest distant quarter of the earth, at any time within the compasse of these 1500 yeeres,

The Principal Navigations, Voiages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation, made by sea or over-land, to the remote and farthest distant quarter of the earth, at any time within the compasse of these 1500 yeeres

London for George Bishop, Ralph Newberie and Robert Barker,1598-1600.

Three Volumes Bound in Two, Folio (280 x 200mm),pp. [24],619; [16],312,204; [16],868pp. Full Mottled Calf, Elaborately Gilt Spines, Black Letter, this set includes in it’s original text : Drake’sVoyage to Cadiz’ withdrawn under Royal Decree by Elizabeth I.

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London for George Bishop, Ralph Newberie and Robert Barker,1598-1600.Three Volumes Bound in Two, Folio (280 x 200mm),pp. [24],619; [16],312,204; [16],868pp. Full Mottled Calf, Elaborately Gilt Spines, Black Letter, this set includes in it’s original text : Drake’sVoyage to Cadiz’ withdrawn under Royal Decree by Elizabeth I.

This is the first issue of the desirable second edition, greatly expanded from the single-volume original version of Hakluyt’s voyages, with the first state of the titlepage (dated 1598 rather than 1599, and mentioning Essex’s “famous victorie” at Cadiz in 1596), and the genuine original printing of the suppressed leaves containing the voyage to Cadiz (pp.607- 619) corresponding with Church’s first issue. This second edition is actually an entirely different book from the initial 1589 compilation.  “This [second edition] was indeed Hakluyt’s monumental masterpiece…Much that was new and important was included: the travels of Newbery and Fitch, Lancaster’s first voyage, the new achievements in the Spanish Main, and particularly Raleigh’s tropical adventures…The book must always remain a great work of history, and a great sourcebook of geography, while the accounts themselves constitute a body of narrative literature which is of the highest value in understanding the spirit and the tendencies of the Tudor age” – Penrose. “It is difficult to overrate the importance and value of this extraordinary collection of voyages” – Sabin. “…An invaluable treasure of nautical information which has affixed to Hakluyt’s name a brilliancy of reputation which time can never efface or obscure” – Church. Hakluyt’s collection will always be the primary source for the history of early British exploration, as well as one of the gems of Elizabethan letters.

Hakluyt took such patriotic pride in his countrymen’s exploits in the fields of travel and adventure that he devoted his life to preserving the records of all British voyages, and to advancing further means for the promotion of wealth and commerce for the nation. “Hakluyt was a vigorous propagandist and empire-builder; his purpose was to further British expansion overseas. He saw Britain’s greatest opportunity in the colonization of America, which he advocated chiefly for economic reasons, but also to spread Protestantism, and to oust Spain” – Hill. The third volume is devoted almost entirely to the Americas, the South Seas, and various circumnavigations of the world. It includes the accounts of Niza, Coronado, Ruiz, and Espejo relating to New Mexico; Ulloa, Drake, and others concerning California; and Raleigh’s account of Guiana. Volume I of this set contains the original printing of the rare “Voyage to Cadiz” (pp.607- 619), which was suppressed by order of Queen Elizabeth after the disgrace of the Earl of Essex; and with the first state of the titlepage in the first volume. The reason for the existence of several states of these Cadiz leaves was the fall from royal favor of the Earl of Essex, who returned to England from Ireland without leave in 1599. The original titlepage, dated 1598, makes mention of Essex’s “famous victorie atchieued at the citie of Cadiz,” and so it was quickly replaced with another version (dated 1599), which makes no mention of Cadiz. Normally, the seven Cadiz leaves were simply removed from the end of the first volume.

The greatest assemblage of travel accounts and navigations to all parts of the world collected up to its time, and a primary source for early New World exploration. This volume contains 243 narratives of voyages and travels in the New World, consisting of some one million seven hundred thousand words.

GROLIER ENGLISH 100, 14. WAGNER SPANISH SOUTHWEST 3, 4, 5, 6, 8c, 9a, 18a. PRINTING & THE MIND OF MAN 105. STC 12626. SABIN 29595, 29597, 29598. JCB (3)I:360-61. EUROPEAN AMERICANA 598/42. BELL H10. HILL 743. PALAU 112038, 112039. BORBA DE MORAES, pp.391-92. Penrose, TRAVEL AND DISCOVERY IN THE RENAISSANCE, p.318. PFORZHEIMER 443. CHURCH 322 (2nd issue of vol. 1). QUINN, p.490.

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