Journal of the Resolution’s Voyage in 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775, on Discovery to the Southern Hemisphere,

£5,000

Journal of the Resolution’s Voyage in 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775, on Discovery to the Southern Hemisphere, by which the non-existence of an undiscovered Continent, between the Equator and the 50th degree of Southern Latitude, is demonstratively proved.

Also a Journal of the Adventure’s Voyage, in the Years 1772, 1773, and 1774. With an Account of the Separation of the Two Ships, and the most remarkable incidents that befel each. Interspersed with historical and geographical descriptions of the islands and countries discovered in the course of their respective voyages

London, F. Newbury, 1775. First Edition, Contemporary calf, morocco gilt label, with folding engraved chart and 5 engraved plates.

An attractive unrestored copy.

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… by which the non-existence of an undiscovered Continent, between the Equator and the 50th degree of Southern Latitude, is demonstratively proved. Also a Journal of the Adventure’s Voyage, in the Years 1772, 1773, and 1774. With an Account of the Separation of the Two Ships, and the most remarkable incidents that befel each. Interspersed with historical and geographical discriptions of the islands and countries discovered in the course of their respective voyages.

London, F. Newbury, 1775. First Edition, Contemporary calf, morocco gilt label, with folding engraved chart and 5 engraved plates.

An attractive unrestored copy.

This work preceded the official account of the second voyage by eighteen months and gives the first eye-witness account in print of the Antarctic regions. There are thirty-eight pages of text concerning the Antarctic, and the map shows the passage of Cook’s two ships to the high southern latitudes.

This account was written by the Irish gunner’s mate on the Resolution whom Cook had picked up in Batavia during his first voyage. It contains many events not recorded in the official account by Cook and gives the reasons which caused Sir Joseph Banks and his twelve assistants to withdraw from the expedition at the last moment. Marra made an unsuccessful attempt to desert at Tahiti on May 14, 1774, during this second voyage.

He describes his punishment in irons in this work.

Beaglehole II, p.CLIII-CLV; Beddie 1270; Hill 1087; Roscove 214; Spence 758; Kroepelien 809; O’Reilly-Reitman 379; Hocken p.14; Conrad p.13; Sabin 16247. 

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