A Brief Discovery or Description of the most Famous Island of Madagascar St. Laurence in Asia neare unto East-India.

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A Brief Discovery or Description of the most Famous Island of Madagascar St. Laurence in Asia neare unto East-India. With relation of the healthfulness, pleasure, fertility and wealth of that country comparable if not transcending all the Easterne parts of the world, a very Earthly paradise; a most fitting and desirable place, to settle an English Colony and Plantation there, rather than any other part of the knowne world

First Edition

London: by E[dward] G[riffin], 1646, 4to (190 x 140mm), Contemporary panelled calf gilt, gilt spine, red morocco title piece.

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…With relation of the healthfulnesse, pleasure, fertility and wealth of that country comparable if not transcending all the Easterne parts of the world, a very Earthly paradise; a most fitting and desirable place, to settle an English Colony and Plantation there, rather than any othwer part of the knowne world……

First Edition

London: by E[dward] G[riffin], 1646, 4to (190 x 140mm), Contemporary panelled calf gilt, gilt spine, red morocco title piece.

” The other volume referred to is that of a merchant who had been concerned in the East India trade, and had suffered much in his efforts to draw the attention of his countrymen to the resources of some countries little known to them. This merchant is Richard Boothby, whose Briefe Discovery or Description of the most famous Island of Madagascar or St. Laurence in Asia near unto East India was published in 1646, having been delayed two years by the hindrance of a “captious licenser,” who blamed the rudeness of the author’s style, and would place the island in Africa, whereas Boothby insisted that it belonged to Asia. The pamphlet is dedicated to the king, the author saying that his estate has been ruined through envy, malice and revenge in India, and oppressed by deep ingratitude, partiality and injustice at home, and imploring his majesty to support the plan of effecting an English plantation in Madagascar, for, “he that is Lord and King of Madagascar may easily in good time be Emperor of all India.” The richness of the island and its resources are extolled as of great promise to the mercantile community.” Cambridge History of English Literature

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