Planiglobium coeleste, et terrestre,

£12,000

Planiglobium coeleste, et terrestre, sive, globus coelestis, atque terrestris nova forma ac norma in planum projectus, omnes globorum circulos, gradus, partes, stellas, sidera, loca, in planis tabulis aeri incisis artificiose exhibens…

Strasbourg, Mark von Heyden, 1628

Planiglobium terrestre. Strasbourg, Mark von Heyden, 1629

2 parts in one vol, 4to (195 x 150 mm), pp [x] 102; [103-] 206, with engraved title to second part and woodcut diagrams in text, as usual without the two folding planispheres but present in the atlas vol below; some browning, otherwise an attractive copy bound in a contemporary manuscript leaf with decorated and coloured initials.

HABRECHT, ISAAC II and JOHANN CHRISTOPH STURM

Planiglobium coeleste, et terrestre….

Nuremberg, Fürst, 1666 Folio (415 x 305 mm), with 14 engraved plates, bound in a uniform manuscript leaf.

First edition of Habrecht’s treatise on the construction of celestial and terrestrial globes and planispheres, accompanied by his pupil Sturm’s atlas intended to illustrate same.

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…sive, globus coelestis, atque terrestris nova forma ac norma in planum projectus, omnes globorum circulos, gradus, partes, stellas, sidera, loca, in planis tabulis aeri incisis artificiose exhibens…

Strasbourg, Mark von Heyden, 1628

[with:] Planiglobium terrestre. Strasbourg, Mark von Heyden, 1629

2 parts in one vol, 4to (195 x 150 mm), pp [x] 102; [103-] 206, with engraved title to second part and woodcut diagrams in text, as usual without the two folding planispheres but present in the atlas vol below; some browning, otherwise an attractive copy bound in a contemporary manuscript leaf with decorated and coloured initials.

[with:]

HABRECHT, ISAAC II and JOHANN CHRISTOPH STURM

Planiglobium coeleste, et terrestre….

Nuremberg, Fürst, 1666

Folio (415 x 305 mm), with 14 engraved plates, bound in a uniform manuscript leaf.

First edition of Habrecht’s treatise on the construction of celestial and terrestrial globes and planispheres, accompanied by his pupil Sturm’s atlas intended to illustrate same. Isaac Habrecht II (1589-1633) was doctor of medicine and professor of mathematics and astronomy at the University of Strasbourg. He was one of a famous family, Swiss in origin, of clock and astronomical instrument makers in Strasbourg; his father, Isaac I, constructed the famous Strasbourg cathedral astronomical clock designed by Conrad Dasypodius and completed in 1574. Isaac II designed a famous celestial globe in 1625, which so impressed Jacob Bartsch, Kepler’s son-in-law and coiner of the term ‘planisphere’, that he modelled his own work upon it. This work was accompanied by two planispheres that are rarely present. Of the several copies in Continental libraries, all but one lack the plates. They are, however, present in the Sturm atlas; one is in fact dated 1628.

C. Sturm (1635-1703) was Habrecht’s student. He organized the first scientific academy in Germany, the ‘Collegium Curiosum sive Experimentale’ at Altdorf in 1672, and introduced the first course in experimental physics in a German university. In 1662, he undertook the task of augmenting Habrecht’s original text and adding a number of folding plates. The plates include the two celestial planispheres from the original work, being polar stereographic celestial charts of the northern and southern constellations, printed from the same plates, two handsome polar projections of the world, and ten folded engravings showing the various parts of his ‘planiglobiums’. The plates, superbly executed by Jacob von der Heyden, were probably intended to be mounted and assembled to form several instruments, each with a revolving plate measuring 27 cm in diameter and a movable pointer. Each was to be supported on an approximately 12 cm base. The work is one of the most beautiful instrument books published in the seventeenth century and certainly one of the rarest, particularly with the full complement of plates.

Regarding the two planispheres, Warner writes: ‘Habrecht derived the bulk of the information for this globe from Plancius. The origin of Rhombus – a constellation near the south pole that as reticulum survives today – is unclear. It may perhaps derive from the quadrilateral arrangement of stars seen by Vespucci around the Antarctic pole. In any case, Rhombus as such seems to have made its first appearance on Habrecht’s globe’ (The sky explored p 104).

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