De fabrica, et usu hemisphaerii uranici…

£5,000

GALLUCCI, GIOVANNI PAOLO

De fabrica, et usu hemisphaerii uranici… Quo instrumento nuper excogitato ea omnia observantur, quae in coelis phenomena dicuntur, una cum horis cuiuscunque generis per solem, lunam, & stellas, quae praesertim non multum ab eclyptica distant… Venice, Bernardo Basa, 1596

 

Folio (272 x 190 mm), ff 28, title printed in red and black and with large solar woodcut vignette, and numerous woodcut illustrations to the text;, the copy otherwise clean and crisp, in marbled boards..

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 Quo instrumento nuper excogitato ea omnia observantur, quae in coelis phenomena dicuntur, una cum horis cuiuscunque generis per solem, lunam, & stellas, quae praesertim non multum ab eclyptica distant… Venice, Bernardo Basa, 1596

 

Folio (272 x 190 mm), ff 28, title printed in red and black and with large solar woodcut vignette, and numerous woodcut illustrations to the text;, the copy otherwise clean and crisp, in marbled boards..

FIRST EDITION OF GALLUCCI’S RAREST WORK, DESCRIBING AND ILLUSTRATING THE CONSTRUCTION OF HIS IMPROVED ARMILLARY SPHERE, a kind of spherical astrolabe. The instrument, which originated in ancient Greece, passed through Arab cultures to Europe in the middle ages, and was developed by Renaissance scientists such as Gallucci  and Tycho Brahe. It was both a model of the heavens and, as here, a calculating instrument for determining celestial motions and positions.

Gallucci presents a step-by-step guide to the construction of his armillary sphere. Each individual part of the instrument is described in detail and illustrated. A large woodcut on folio 9 depicts the assembled sphere. The second and third parts of the book describe the instrument’s various applications. Gallucci provides a table of stars, their positions and their magnitudes for the determination of time and position.

Gallucci (1538 -1621) was a Venetian mathematician, cartographer, astronomer, and humanist. His is famous for, among other things, the first Copernican star atlas, his Theatrum mundi, published in Venice in 1588.

Adams G164; Riccardi I 567.1 transposes the date (1569 for 1596) and describes the work as quarto in format; OCLC records a single US location, at Brigham Young University

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