Imperium Romano Germanicum in suos Circulos Eleotratus et Status

£100

Copper engraved map, hand coloured, large decorative cartouches including portrait, coats of arms, central vertical fold repaired without loss, overall slight toning, Nuremberg, c.1720.

Copper engraved map, hand coloured, large decorative cartouches including portrait, coats of arms, central vertical fold repaired without loss, overall slight toning, Nuremberg, c.1720.

A decorative map of Germany during the Roman Empire. Extends from Paris to Warsaw and Denmark to Italy, showing the many cities established by the Romans.

Johann Baptiste Homann (1664-1724) was the most prominent and prolific map publisher of the 18th century. After studying in a Jesuit school with the intent of becoming a Dominican Priest, before converting to Protestantism in 1687. Following his conversion he moved to Nuremberg and worked as a notary until 1702 where he founded the famous Homann Heirs publishing company. In the next 5 years he would publish hundreds of maps and develop a distinctive style recognised by heavy engraving, elaborate allegorical cartouche work and vibrant hand colouring. Due to the lower cost of printing in Germany, Homann was able to undercut the French and Dutch publishers, establishing himself as an important entity in the European map market. In 1715, Johann was named Imperial Geographer to the Holy Roman Empire by Charles VI and made a member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences. This appointment gave him access to the most up to date cartographic information, and most importantly his reputation and contacts gained him imperial printing privileges which protected his publications. Johann is best known for this Grosser Atlas ueber die ganze Welt, or the Grand Atlas of the World, published in 1716.

Provenance: H.A.J. Staples of Her Majesty’s Service

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