Chinese Pilot. Drawings of Chinese Coastal Profiles from HMS Cornwallis.

£2,500

Scarce Survival from The Opium Wars.

China, On board ship, [1840],Oblong small folio (151 x 235mm.), 21 leaves with 19 pages of drawings of coastal profiles, with accompanying explanatory notes and landmarks, green paper boards over leather spine, untitled.

Scarce Survival from The Opium Wars.

China, On board ship, [1840],Oblong small folio (151 x 235mm.), 21 leaves with 19 pages of drawings of coastal profiles, with accompanying explanatory notes and landmarks, green paper boards over leather spine, untitled.

A competent series of coastal drawings for use in navigation on HMS Cornwallis.
Drawings of the pending dangers when navigating Chinese waters, done by A.P. Greene, mate and then officer on H.M.S. Cornwallis. The areas covered are Amoy, Chincheu, Chimmo Bay, Namao and others.
A note on the upper paste-down reads “To accompany Remark Book Vol. 1. Coast of China / In Amoy etc. / Marks for avoiding Dangers, by A.P. Green.
Greene died in action, was buried in China and was posthumously awarded the China Medal in 1842.
The Treaty of Nanking (Nanjing) was a peace treaty that ended the First Opium War (1839–1842) between the United Kingdom and China on 29 August 1842. It was the rst of what the Chinese later called the unequal treaties.
In the wake of China’s military defeat, with British warships poised to attack Nanking, British and Chinese officials negotiated on board HMS Cornwallis anchored at the city. On 29 August, British representative Sir Henry Pottinger and Qing representatives Qiving, Yilibu, and Niu Jian signed the treaty, which consisted of thirteen articles. The treaty was ratified by the Daoguang Emperor on 27 October and Queen Victoria on 28 December. Ratification was exchanged in Hong Kong on 26 June 1843. A copy of the treaty is kept by the British government while another copy is kept by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Republic of China at the National Palace Museum in Taipei.

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